BADC Chair Nazmul Hassan Receives PhD

December 22, 2011 by · Leave a Comment 

By Nazmul Hassan

The Bangladeshi American Democratic Caucus (BADC) Chairman Nazmul Hassan (Shahin) received a PhD degree in Industrial Engineering from Wayne State University in Detroit, Michigan on Saturday, December 10, 2011. Shahin’s Dissertation Topic was “A Collaborative Framework in Outbound Logistics for the US Automakers.” His advisor was Dr. Alper E. Murat.
In his research, Shahin presented an integrated collaboration framework for the outbound logistics operations of the US automakers. Shahin proposed three levels for the US automakers to form outbound logistics collaboration: operational, tactical, and strategic. He developed a capacitated multi-commodity multi-period minimum cost network flow (MCNF) model with frequency based shipments. He also developed and integrated new inventory, lost sales, and expedited shipments models into the MCNF model and then reformulated the baseline model through the novel linearization approaches for computational tractability.

Operational, tactical, and strategic collaboration adaptations are developed using the baseline model. Shahin conducted stylized experiments for sensitivity analysis and a case study based on two major US automotive OEMs (Ford and GM) to demonstrate the benefits of collaboration. The research results indicate that collaboration at all levels improves the delivery and cost performance of the Outbound Logistics Network Systems.

Through this research, Shahin showed that collaboration in the intra- and inter-OEM outbound logistics operations is a critical area that the US automakers need to pay attention and prioritize in their cost reduction initiatives. Through the horizontal collaboration in the outbound logistics operations, the US automakers can deliver finished vehicles to their customer at the optimum cost levels which cannot be achieved in isolation. The optimization of outbound logistics operations through consolidation and collaboration among OEMs has tremendous potential to contribute to the profitability by lowering the cost of transportation, in-house inventory, transportation time, and facility costs.

Shahin and his wife Farzana Ferdous, daughter Samin Hassan (9), and son Safaat Hassan (4) live in Belleville, Michigan. 

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Helping Detroit… Tree by Tree

November 17, 2011 by · Leave a Comment 

By Jumana Abusalah

Jumana AbusalahDetroit is slowly but surely changing for the better. There are many sites and organizations that have been created for the sole purpose of bettering Detroit. One such organization is titled “The Greening of Detroit”. It is a non-profit organization whose mission is to inspire and guide others to create a ‘greener’ Detroit through planting and environmental educational programs.  They work to benefit Detroit socially, economically, and environmentally.

On Sunday November 6th, Wayne State University’s Muslim Student Association (MSA) teamed up with The Greening of Detroit to plant trees along Dingeman Park. The group of volunteers was large and we succeeded in planting many trees. It was  a very fun experience, yet it was very inspirational. A person does not really think that a tree can make a difference, but after working hard digging and planting for hours, we looked at the end result and realized that that planting a single tree does make a difference! The entire street, once empty and vacant, was transformed into a beautiful landscape with colorful fall leaves and maple trees. 

Waking up the next day with aches and pains never felt better! Feeling that we did something to help the community and please Allah at the same time, left the entire MSA satisfied and eager for more. This experience inspired many students to care about their community and made them realize that when we work together, we can achieve great things!

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Islamic Awareness Week at Wayne State University.

November 10, 2011 by · Leave a Comment 

Press Release, Wayne MSA

Wayne is planning annual Islamic Awareness Week for November -

Below is the program for the week:

All the events are free and open to the entire campus.

Theme: Revolution of Reason

Monday, Nov. 14th – “Ask a Muslim” – Easel Boards  (people ask q’s about Islam)
—–Location: Undergraduate Library
—–Time: 1:00pm-3:00pm

Tuesday, Nov. 15th – Islam Fair    (with Discover Islam posters, hijab demonstrations, etc)
—–Location: Undergraduate Library
—–Time: 1:00pm-3:00pm

Wednesday, Nov. 16th – Keynote Address with Imam Abdul Malik
—–Topic: Reformation of the Heart
—–Location: Bernath Auditorium
—–Time: 2:00pm-4:00pm

Thursday, Nov. 17th – Fast-A-Thon: A Taste of Islam with Saqib Shafi
—–Location: Grand Ballroom 2nd Floor Student Center
—–Time: 4:45pm-7:30pm

Friday, Nov. 18th – Campus “Jumu’ah” (Friday Prayer) – Islam: Liberating Hearts & Minds
—–Location: Grand Ballroom 2nd Floor Student Center
—–Time: 2:30pm-3:00pm

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Commemorating September 11th in Detroit

September 22, 2011 by · Leave a Comment 

By Jumana Abusalah

7624788As we all know, September 11, 2011 was the anniversary of the tragic attacks that occurred in New York City ten years ago.  People all around the world were devastated that innocent lives were lost; they were shocked that anyone could do such a horrible thing! Many communities held events and ceremonies that commemorated the anniversary of 9/11, including Wayne State University (WSU), in downtown Detroit.  The WSU event was an interfaith Remembrance Ceremony that took place on Thursday September 8, 2011.

Students, staff, and faculty of all different religions and cultures gathered around in Wayne State’s Undergraduate Library. The ceremony was held on a weekday instead of the weekend, in order to allow more staff and students to attend. It was only a twenty minute event, but it held great meaning.  One of the ceremony speakers was WSU Dean of Students, David Strauss. He remarked that it is a great thing to be able to have such an event on campus and to be able to have people of different faiths and backgrounds attend. “We want to respect and honor those that we lost, but the message that we want to get out there is that we want to promote civility and understanding and coming together.” It did not matter what religion you were, it just mattered that you were there for a reason, and that this reason has brought everyone together. 

The event also included a poetry reading, a flag ceremony, and a moment of silence. WSU is a very diverse university, and was therefore the perfect place to hold such an event. It showed the coming together of people in remembrance of the sad day that took place ten years ago. This date in history brought people from different backgrounds and states together at Wayne State for the Remembrance Ceremony.  

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My Faith: Rep. Keith Ellison from Catholic to Muslim

September 8, 2011 by · Leave a Comment 

By Chris Welch, CNN

769265196_0c4e4f2cdd_oMinneapolis, Minnesota (CNN) –Prior to 2006, few people even knew that then-Minnesota state legislator Keith Ellison was a Muslim. Because of his English name, he said, no one thought to ask.
But five years ago, when he ran for a seat in the United States House of Representatives – a race he would go on to win – word of his religious affiliation began to spread.

“When I started running for Congress it actually took me by surprise that so many people were fascinated with me being the first Muslim in Congress,” said Ellison, a Democrat now serving his third term in the House.

“But someone said to me, ‘Look Keith, think of a person of Japanese origin running for Congress six years after Pearl Harbor–this might be a news story.’”

Though Ellison’s status as the first Muslim elected to Congress is widely known, fewer are aware that he was born into a Catholic family in Detroit and was brought up attending Catholic schools.
But he said he was never comfortable with that faith.

“I just felt it was ritual and dogma,” Ellison said. “Of course, that’s not the reality of Catholicism, but it’s the reality I lived. So I just kind of lost interest and stopped going to Mass unless I was required to.”

It wasn’t until he was a student at Wayne State University in Detroit when Ellison began, “looking for other things.”

He doesn’t have an elaborate explanation of what led him to convert to Islam in college, though he said he was “drawn to the multi-national congregation.”

“I would really like to hear somebody who is really articulate about the elements of their faith conversion. I’m not,” he said. “I investigated it, it worked for me, and it made me have a sense of inspiration and wonder, and I became a Muslim. It’s been working for me ever since.”

Ellison’s political opponents have made his faith an issue in his congressional campaigns.

“I would caution [opponents] that it doesn’t work. People are not hateful like that,” he said. “If you come up saying, ‘Vote for me because Ellison is a Muslim and I’m not,’ nine out of ten voters are going to see that as the silliness that it is.”

“It doesn’t hurt my feelings at all,” he said. “In fact I actually feel sorry for these people.”

And he said he has never had a second thought about converting.

“My faith and my identity as a Muslim – I never saw it as something that made my job harder,” he said. “It’s just an aspect of who I am.

It’s the time that we live in. We have to respond to the realities of the world we’re in.”

But Ellison acknowledges that his faith has given him something of a national profile, not always in ways that are welcome.

In March, he testified in nationally televised congressional hearings, called by Rep. Peter King, a New York Republican, to explore what King said was radicalization in American Muslim communities.
At the hearing, Ellison choked up as he described the sacrifices of Muslim Americans who tried to save others in the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks.

“Without any of my choosing or desire I became somewhat of a symbolic figure,” Ellison said. “And I urge anyone to avoid becoming a symbolic figure if you can. But I ended up in that position, so I just figured why not talk about it? Why not help try to bring people together with it?”

“Faith really should be a bridge, not a wall,” Ellison said. “Because at the end of the day we should be focusing on what you believe, not what your religion is.”

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“Transformation Detroit” Meetings

June 23, 2011 by · Leave a Comment 

By TMO Stringer

IMG070Monday thru Wednesday there was a series of meetings with reporters from around the country including several from The Muslim Observer, which showcased efforts to improve Detroit’s position in concert with the city government and major industry players including many in the auto industry, and educational and health institutions in the Detroit area.

Wayne State University, the Henry Ford Health System, and Blue Cross Blue Shield have all made large efforts to build the demographics of Detroit, encouraging through financial incentives and by moving their headquarters to downtown Detroit.  The results have been a direct boost to the micro-economy of Detroit, but more importantly a change in the perception of Detroit–from a perception of its danger to an understanding of the opportunity there.

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Muslim Family Services Fundraiser

March 18, 2010 by · Leave a Comment 

By Adil James, MMNS

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Livonia–March 13—American Muslims have made inroads institutionally, with established mosques, advocacy groups, and media.  There are also fledgling efforts to build funeral services and graveyards and other necessary forms of care.  But the next level of institution building is to create self-sufficiency in medical and other care. 

One group which has begun the work of providing community and social and medical services to Muslims is Muslim Family Services, a devision of ICNA Relief.

Muslim Family Services held a fundraiser on Saturday night at the Radisson Hotel in Livonia, hosting about 250 people for an evening which celebrated the accomplishments and looked at the future goals of the organization.

Muslim Family Services is led most prominently by Dr. Ali Suleiman, Ph.D, who studied at the University of Michigan and at the University of Madina Saudi Arabia.  Dr. Asim Hussain (not to be confused with keynote speaker Altaf Husain), professor of Wayne State University, is also involved. Mr. Yousuf Vaid is also prominently involved. The organization focuses largely on providing social services, mainly specializing in marriage counseling, but also providing many other services including subsidizing funeral payments and providing food and other emergency care to Muslims in need.

The fundraising dinner began with Maghrib prayer, followed by a welcome by the MC Yousuf Vaid, followed by recitation of Qur`an by a young man, Nadeem Gulam, then dinner. Then there was a slide presentation by Steve Hernandez on the accomplishments of Muslim Family Services, followed by a keynote speech by Harvard Professor, Dr. Altaf Husain. Finally there was a fundraiser and a closing du’a.

Mr. Hernandez spoke movingly of the accomplishments of Muslim Family Services, pointing out its cooperation with other groups, and its work to support the community’s education, activities to minimize family violence (in coordination with ACCESS and the State of Michigan and Wayne County), counseling of individuals, families, pre-marital and marital counseling, psychological counseling, anger management, and substance abuse counseling.

He spoke movingly about MFS’s Janaza fund, which provides about seven funerals per year, at a cost of $3,000 each.

Dr. Altaf Husain also spoke movingly, focusing more on the future of Muslim healthcare in the United States, pointing out that the Muslim community faces similar challenges to those faced before by Catholics and Jews (such as dietary restrictions, discrimination, refused treatment, predatory missionary work by those who see vulnerable people of a different religion, and cultural conflicts)–who in the 1850s responded by building their own hospitals which exist to this day.  Husain emphasized one such hospital, Mt. Sinai, which had its origins in the need of Jews to respond to the above challenges, but which now serves the wider community.

Muslim Family Services emphasized that they provide services in a professional and confidential manner, and invited all Muslims facing issues to come to them for assistance.

Contact Muslim Family Services at 734-678-0435, or at www.muslimfamilyservices.org.

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See pictures from this event at www.muslimobserver.com.

ACCESS Executive Director to Give Leadership Lesson at Wayne State

February 18, 2010 by · Leave a Comment 

ACCESS Executive Director Hassan Jaber will present a special lecture March 30, 2010 to a group of students at Wayne State University.  The lecture will be about building relationships between residents and organizations in Detroit and how to engage with local communities. Jaber also will discuss his success and experiences as Executive Director at ACCESS. Jaber received a bachelor of arts degree in economics from Wayne State’s College of Liberal Arts and Sciences in 1987 and a master’s degree in public administration from WSU in 1993.

Lessons in Leadership is an alumni speaker series co-sponsored by the WSU Alumni Association that explores the topic of leadership.  Students have an opportunity to listen to former students and community leaders share their own leadership experiences and hear about what works and what doesn’t, as well as discuss the role leadership plays in their work day after day.  Wayne State students can register for the lecture by clicking here.

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