Community News (V13-I42)

October 13, 2011 by · Leave a Comment 

Camden street named in honor of Dr. Mustapha Khan

CAMDEN, NJ–Trinidad born Dr.Mustapha Khan was a popular medic in Camden who really struck a cord with the people in the area as a physician. He was honored last week when the street he used to walk down to his office was renamed Dr. Mustapha M. Khan Way in his honor.

Khan, who died in 2009 at 84, retired from his medical practice the previous year. He had spent 51 years practicing medicine in the city, taking all patients who came in and treating them even when he knew they might not be able to pay.

“He found his bliss, found his home in Camden, New Jersey, in this community,” said Khan’s son, Mustapha Jr. “He really savored being a man of the people, treating everyone who came through his doors.”

“Whether it was a little kid with a runny nose, a teenager with a behavioral problem or some adult who needed help changing a tire outside, anything he could do, he was willing to do,” recalled Khan’s son Rasheed. “He didn’t care about the reward, didn’t care about the money or accolades. That’s the kind of person he was.”

Over the years, Khan was offered chances to practice medicine with large health systems such as Cooper, West Jersey and Lourdes. He turned them all down to ensure that he could keep practicing medicine his way in Camden’s Parkside neighborhood and helping people in a city he didn’t want to abandon.

Khan also mentored children in the area and many of them are now themselves professionals in diverse fields.

Charolette Musilms, Christians hold interfaith meeting

CHAROLETTE,NC–Mecklenburg Ministries held its first interfaith prayer meeting, designed to promote greater understanding and common spiritual ground between Christians and Muslims.
The Ministries’ youth council, along with Park Road Baptist and the Muslim American Society  co-sponsored the event.

Imam John Ederer  explained Muslim traditions of prayer, then invited those on hand to take part in or observe the Islamic sunset prayer.

The Revs. Amy and Russ Dean, Park Road’s pastors, discussed Christian prayer, then lead vespers.

Talking and praying together, “will be a much more productive way to spend the evening than arguing over political divisions or pointing a long finger of derision at people because they are different than us,” Russ Dean said in a prepared statement.

Ramy Ahmed wins award at Technon Conference

AUSTIN,TX–Ramy Ahmed, a graduate student in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Texas A&M University, won a Best Paper/Presentation award at the 2011 Semiconductor Research Corporation (SRC) Technon Conference.

Ahmed and advisor Dr. Sebastian Hoyos won for their paper, “A 384-MHz Continuous-Time ΔƩ Modulator Using a Hybrid Feedback DAC Based on Spectral Shaping of Jitter Induced Errors,” in the analog/mixed-signal/RF circuit design session.

Ahmed’s award is among a select group of SRC-funded projects. Hoyos said Ahmed’s work has received excellent feedback in the past three years and has had SRC project reviews with one patent already filed by SRC member companies. They also have been invited to submit a full journal article for an IEEE Transactions on Circuits and Systems I special issue coming up soon.

Ahmed received his B.Sc. and M.Sc. in electronics and communications engineering from Cairo University (Egypt). He currently is working toward his Ph.D. in the Analog and Mixed-Signal Center, under Hoyos’ supervision. During the spring of 2008, Ahmed was an intern at Rice Nanoscale Systems Laboratory at Rice University, where he worked on non-autonomous chaotic oscillators and 60 GHz receivers. In 2011, Ahmed held a summer internship with the analog and mixed-signal group at QUALCOMM Inc. in San Diego, Calif.

Ahmed’s research interests include data converters and multistandard wireless receivers. He has co-authored more than 15 publications in peer-reviewed journals and conferences and has one patent filed under the SRC/GRC patent program. Since September 2009, Ahmed is listed in Marquis Who’s Who in the World, Who’s Who in Science and Engineering and Who’s Who in America. He is a member of IEEE and the Phi Kappa Phi honor society.

Anti-Muslim fliers spark debate in San Diego

SAN DIEGO,CA–A religious organization’s campaign that focuses on passing out anti-Muslim literature to students is being criticized in San Diego.

The group passes out the fliers on public property just outside of the high schools. They have gone to Clairemont High School and Kearny High School, as well as other schools in Los Angeles and the Bay Area.

The fliers say as Islam grows “Muslims become increasingly more aggressive” and “We must defend students from being recruited and radicalized into Islam.”

The fliers have sparked safety concerns for the Muslim community.

“We’re also concerned about the bullying that’s going on in public schools. So this is only going to spark the fire of ‘Islam-a-phobia,’ possible bullying of Muslim students,” said Edgar Hopida of the Council on American-Islamic Relations.

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Phoenicians Partner for Peace

September 15, 2011 by · Leave a Comment 

By Nidah Chatriwala

11

8426551As the nation united to peacefully acknowledge the 10-year anniversary of 9/11, Arizona State University (ASU), held an interfaith service, inviting Muslims, Christians and Jews.

Partnering For Peace was a program encouraged by President Obama for schools to participate in an interfaith worship in remembrance of 9/11 and ASU was one of them to accept.

The service was held at Tempe campus of ASU, attracting a large diverse crowd, which sung along the chorus or stood silently in respect to religious recitations performed.

The event began with Sue Ringler introducing TEAM-Tempe Interfaith, who organized the service, saying their mission used to be limited to collecting and donating canned foods but 9/11 changed everything, and they began giving hope through service of love in the community.

Partnering for Peace was also represented by a group of young adults called iMagine, who shared their goal of breaking down interfaith barriers to help teach each other the richness of diversity.

Soon the chorus sang “Where Can I Turn for Peace” on a candlelit stage with an enlarged photograph of a glittering white dove, represented peace in the background. 

The audience was encouraged to stand in silence as the three Holy Scriptures: Bible, Torah and the Holy Quran’s title covers were displayed on the screen, followed by each person reciting excerpts from them.

Rabbi Dean Shapiro read Isaiah from the Torah, then Pastor Chris Gonzales read Luke from the New Testament and Ayman Alhadheri recited verses from the Quran, which were translated by Elena Coassolo.

To help the interfaith audience understand the meanings of the holy recitations, three speakers shared stories of peace from their Christian, Jewish and Muslim traditions.

Susan Schanerman performed her Jewish tradition story called “A Talmudic Tale of Peace” as she created pictures with her hands and directed audience’s mood to various tones of her voice.

Following Schanerman’s performance, Doug Bland connected his Christian tradition story of “The Saint and the Sultan” to the Muslim influence of building Christianity and extracting the greeting “peace be upon you” from Muslims to saying it among Christian followers as well. He credited Islam’s teachings, especially to be more merciful to each other, to improving Christianity’s message among its followers.

To build on Bland’s story, Saiaf Abdallah told the “Musa and the Good Things to Come” Islamic story about Moses and Khidr’s journey of seeking knowledge through patience. At the end of the story he added that we must learn to see wisdom in atrocities such as 9/11 that united us all.

As the event came to a close, iMagine group members painted a rainbow representing Jewish, Christian and Muslim unity, as the audience stood up arm-in-arm chanting freedom and peace.

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