‘Eid at the Islamic Center of Detroit

November 10, 2011 by · Leave a Comment 

By Jumana Abusalah

Jumana AbusalahMuslim residents of Dearborn and Detroit, Michigan woke up on November 6th to a bright and sunny Sunday morning.  It was Eid Ul Adha, and it was already off to a good start. Muslims gather on this holy day to mark the end of Hajj and to commemorate and remember Prophet Ibrahim (as).

The ICD (Islamic Center of Detroit) is a big success every year, as it is on the edge of Dearborn and Detroit, where many Muslims reside.  This year was no different! The ICD was swarming with no less than 4,000 people! Upon arrival to the mosque, people gave their Salaams to each other and recited takbeer in unison.  When prayer was called, thousands and thousands of Muslims rushed to thank Allah for the blessed opportunities and blessings He bestows upon us. Foot to foot, and shoulder to shoulder, there was no better feeling than standing united with so many fellow Muslims on this blessed day.

After prayer, everyone sat to listen to the Imam’s Khutba. One main point of the Khutba was on the importance of forgiveness and renewing our relationships with fellow Muslims. The significance and holiness of this day should encourage us to erase any grudges or fights we might have between family and friends.  

Along with the Imam, we thanked Allah for the freedom of the Palestinian prisoners and realized that this was the first Eid that they were able to celebrate since their imprisonment. This was proof that our du’aas do not go unanswered and that as long as we stay close to Allah, He will help us and guide us Insh’Allah. It was especially touching and moving to many people, considering the events that have recently transpired in the Middle East. We then raised our hands in humbleness and made du’aa for all Muslims and thanked Allah for allowing us to experience another wonderful Eid. 

After prayer, people dispersed excitedly to continue their Eid activities. Some children spent their energy by jumping on the moon bounce; others ran excitedly to where there were free gifts and colorful balloons. People that had not eaten raced to the falafel sandwiches and different assortments of pies and sweets.  Most importantly was the gathering and meeting of friends and family. This is the day where people forgot their problems and simply enjoyed each other’s company, reassured year by year that Muslims will always be there for each other and that Allah will always be there to help.

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Open House at Tawheed Center

June 16, 2011 by · Leave a Comment 

By Adil James, TMO

Farmington–June 10–For the first time in six years the Tawheed Center in Farmington welcomed local non-Muslim residents in a large coordinated open house and free health clinic this past Saturday.  About 200 non-Muslims visited to tour the mosque, enjoy Muslim food and culture (henna and calligraphy), and listen to presentations about Islam by mosque volunteers and professional Muslim speakers including Dawud Walid of CAIR-Michigan. 

The open house was also a chance to show the immense work that has gone into the mosque since the last open house in 2005.

The setup consisted of an opportunity for the visitors to watch perhaps 100 Muslims pray dhohr prayer in the mosque, a tour through the semi-divided banquet hall, where on one side about 20 volunteers stood with posters describing Islam, young volunteers who described various issues about Islam and welcomed questions; and on the other side of the banquet hall a question and answer presentation session tried to address the visitors’ concerns about Islam.

The volunteers were mostly high school students–one of them, Mehak Haq, said that she was emphasizing that there is no compulsion in religion–that Muslims are guided to allow non-Muslims to worship freely.  She said that “It is a good opportunity–very insightful questions… the people seemed respectful, very respectful.”

Volunteer Ayyub Khan said that what surprised him about the event was the diversity of the visitors.  Indeed, the visitors to the mosque showed an admirable range of ethnicities which is very gratifying in sometimes segregated Detroit.  The visitors seemed to represent all the major demographic groups in America by race and age, the only possibly underrepresented group being adolescents and children.

Tawheed Trustee Asim Khan  spoke very happily about the many visitors, estimating the number of visitors who had come so far, and also expressing his happiness with the volunteers:  “See how many young people are involved? We are trying to get them ready to run things later on.”

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