Another Angle on the Moon

August 4, 2011 by · Leave a Comment 

By Adil James, TMO

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA         Despite ISNA’s endorsement of the moon calculations performed by the Fiqh Council of North America, the debate in the Muslim community over the necessity of physically sighting the moon continues, and an interesting contribution to that debate has been made by Mr. Nabeel Tarabishy, of Goodsamt, LLC.  Mr. Tarabishy spoke Saturday night at the Islamic Cultural Association before a small gathering on the subject “The Moon and the Islamic Calendar.”

Mr. Tarabishy’s speech delved into background issues concerning the astronomy of moon sighting, and then described his own approach to the issue in relation to the ongoing debate.
He began by exploring the Qur`anic Ayas concerning seeking knowledge, pointing out the important issue that Allah in Holy Qur`an said that the intercalation of the months that had been done by the pagan Arabs before Islam was not just wrong, not just kufr, but was “excessive kufr,” thus showing the importance to Allah of our seeking to understand and abide by the underlying structure of the universe determined the Almighty.  “We can’t change the facts of the universe according to our desire, we must accept facts, and truth,” he said.

Allah Himself divided the year into 12 months, the week into 7 days.

Tarabishy also pointed out that no world civilization has existed without a calendar, and he explored the history of the Christian Julian and Gregorian calendars.  He explained that the lunar year is 11 days shorter than the solar year, and he spoke about the intercalation done by the Jewish and Chinese calendars–which he explained is done in a “less chaotic” fashion than was done by the pagan Arabs before Islam.

Then Tarabishy explored the physical dimensions of the lunar and solar progression through the seasons and months and years, and described the physical positions of those three astronomical bodies over the year.

Then he introduced his argument that the Islamic calendar–as a window to our history and culture and more–should be made as predictable as the solar calendar, arguing that it should be possible to plan travel to coincide with any specific day of the Islamic year, thus calculations will be necessary.  He listed extremely prominent Muslim theologians who he said had endorsed calculation, including most notably Imam Shafi’i.

His chief requirements of such a calculation-based Islamic calendar were that “false positives” and “false negatives” contradictory to the physical sightings of the moon should be avoided or excluded.

To learn more, please visit  his website, goodsamt.com.

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FCNA Statement on Ramadan and ‘Eid, 1432 / 2011

June 9, 2011 by · Leave a Comment 

By Dr. Muzzammil Siddiqi

Ramadan_Moon [sMsxOne.Com]

The first day of Ramadan will be Monday, August 1, 2011 and Eid al-Fitr on Tuesday, August 30, 2011,  inshaAllah.

“O you who believe, fasting is prescribed to you as it was prescribed to those before you, that you may (learn) self-restraint.” Qur’an 2:183

The Fiqh Council of North America (FCNA) recognizes astronomical calculation as an acceptable Shar’i method for determining the beginning of Lunar months including the months of Ramadan and Shawwal.  FCNA uses Makkah al-Mukarram as a conventional point and takes the position that the conjunction must take place before sunset in Makkah and moon must set after sunset in Makkah.

On the basis of this method the dates of Ramadan and Eidul Fitr for the year 1432 AH are established as follows:

1st of Ramadan will be on Monday, August 1, 2011

1st of Shawwal will be on Tuesday, August 30, 2011

Ramadan 1432 AH:

The Astronomical New Moon is on July 30, 2011 (Saturday) at 18:40 Universal Time (9:40 pm  Makkah time). Sunset at Makkah on July 30 is at 7:01 pm local time, while moonset at Makkah is 6:41pm local time (20 minute before sunset).  Therefore the following day Sunday, July 31, 2011 is not the 1st day of Ramadan.   First day of Ramadan is Monday, August 1, insha’Allah. First Tarawih prayer will be on Sunday, July 31, 2011.

Eid ul-Fitr 1432 AH:

The Astronomical New Moon is on August 29, 2011 (Monday) at 3:04 Universal Time (6:04 am  Makkah time). On Monday, August 29, sunset at Makkah is 6:40 p.m. local time, while moonset is at 6:44  pm local time. Therefore, first day of Shawwal, i.e., Eid ul-Fitr is Tuesday, August 30, insha’Allah.

May Allah (swt) keep us on the right path and accept our fasting and prayers, Ameen.  For more detailed information, please visit: www.fiqhcouncil.org orwww.moonsighting.com.

Sincerely,
Dr. Muzammil Siddiqi
Chairman
Fiqh Council of North America

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Moonsighting for Dhul-Hijjah 1430

November 23, 2009 by · Leave a Comment 

Crescent-Moon-20080210-1280 Saudi Arabia announced on Tuesday, November 17, that `Eid Al-Adha, one of the two main religious festivals on the Islamic calendar, will fall on Friday, November 27. "The new moon of Dhul-Hijjah was sighted by trusted witnesses on Tuesday in a number of provinces," the Supreme Judicial Council said in a statement published by the state-run Saudi Press Agency. "Thus, Wednesday, November 18, will mark the beginning of the lunar month of Dhul-Hijjah."

The Astronomical New Moon is on November 16, 2009 (Monday) at 19:14 UT. This moon cannot be seen anywhere in the world. On November 17, it still cannot be seen in Asia, Europe and Canada. It can be seen in South Africa, Central America, and South America. In USA, there is a small chance to see it on November 17.

Fiqh Council of North America Announces EID UL-ADHA

According to astronomical calculations, the month of Zul Hijjah will begin on November 18 and thus the expected date of Eid ul Adha is Friday, November 27. It is confirmed by Saudi Authorities that ‘Arafah date for Hajj is on Thursday, November 26, and Eid-al-Adha is on Friday November 27.

From Moonsighting.com

Ramadan 1430, New Moon

August 20, 2009 by · Leave a Comment 

new moon--not the Ramadan moon

The new moon for Ramadan 1430 comes in, according to www.nevis.columbia.edu, on Thursday August 20th, at 5:02 AM EST.  Therefore the Ramadan moon has already been born and whether one begins fasting depends on what method of determining the beginning of Ramadan one accepts, or which mosque or school of thought one follows, or for Shi’a it depends on which marja they follow.

By FCNA/ ISNA calculations, this new moon is impossible to spot in Mecca after sunset on Thursday, therefore although the new moon is in it is deemed by the reasoning of the Fiqh Council to bring in Ramadan the following evening.  Therefore FCNA will begin fasting on Saturday, tarawih prayers on Friday.  Many American mosques follow the influential ISNA / FCNA calculations. 

Other mosques follow ICNA, which has a different means of calculation.  Hamza Yusuf and Zaytuna insist on local physical sightings of the moon.  Many American mosques follow specific countries, without adhering to what other local mosques are doing. 

Saudi Arabia will fast Saturday, tarawih prayers beginning Friday. 

In the coming days insha`Allah we will report on when different communities began their fasting.

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