Day of Goodness

April 22, 2010 by · Leave a Comment 

By Adil James, MMNS

P4178782 Southfield–April 21–Small fundraiser highlights up and coming local Muslim organizations, delivers goodness despite missing keynote speaker.

The Islamic Shura Council of Michigan’s “Day of Goodness” last Saturday night was deprived of its keynote speaker due to a problem with specialized visas. 

However, many prominent and active Muslims from local organizations still attended, perhaps showing more in quality than in quantity, with about 100 people present, but among those people perhaps 10 imams, and the leadership of the many organizations associated with the Islamic Shura Council of Michigan.

The event is essentially a fundraiser, and by the end of the evening it had earned approximately $75,000 towards its stated goal of $150,000.  The event was in a conference room at the Southfield Westin hotel on Town Center Drive.

ISCOM Chair Dr. Mouhib Ayas explained that intended keynote speaker Jamal Badawi’s visa did not permit him to speak at Not-for-profit fundraisers.  So Badawi was not able to speak despite his coming to Michigan from Canada, and despite his having given the khutbah at the Bloomfield Muslim Unity Center earlier in the day.

ISCOM was established in 2005 as a non-profit umbrella organization with, according to the dayofgoodness website, “the mission of providing coordination between and building cohesiveness among the Islamic centers mosques, and organizations in Michigan.  The council works for the betterment of all Muslims, to advance Muslim interests, and to promote Islamic values.”

The chairman of the Board of Directors is Mouhib Ayas, and its Vice Chair is Arif Huskic.  Attorney Misbah Shahid is the Secretary, and several other prominent Southeast Michigan Muslims are also on the board–the executive assistant and first employee is Reheem Hanifa.

20 different mosques, comprising the majority of the major mosques in Southeast Michigan, including the biggest Shi’a mosque and most of the big Sunni mosques, are involved.

Dr. Ayas gave a long but interesting presentation with a slideshow demonstrating the accomplishments of ISCOM.  He pointed out the association of ISCOM with Gleaners Food Bank, and also showed the institutional progress the organization has made by hiring a grant writer to apply for available grants–this alone has netted thousands of dollars in projects and may likely bring more projects in the near future.  One project the grant writing process obtained was a $25,000 Blue Cross Blue Shield project.

One program he spoke about was the “Maintaining Houses of Allah” program, which is designed to address the disparity between the wealthy mosques and the mosques with less money that are sometimes dilapidated and run down for lack of funds.

In a moving presentation Dr. Ayas pointed to pictures, first of a wealthy mosque then of a more destitute mosque, saying “This is a house of Allah, and this is a house of Allah,” driving home the point that ISCOM is working to benefit Muslims who really need help in order to worship Allah in clean and nice mosques.

P4178785 Another ISCOM project is working with MSA’s, using them really as a lever to connect to non-Muslims in universities–”we need to start influencing minds when people are young.”  He explained the goal is to meet future leaders of this country early on, and Dr. Ayas gave examples of programs where non-Muslim students fasted (not during Ramadan) in order to understand the effects of fasting on Muslims.

Dr. Ayas explained also that in order for the institution to move forward, ISCOM needs to start hiring professional full-time people, and he gave the example of Mr. Reheem Hanifa who has begun working full-time for the organization.

Dr. Ayas also showed a fairly inspiring diagram which showed ISCOM as the hub of a wheel reaching about 15 different important Muslim organizations in Southeast Michigan, including Muslim Family Services, MSA’s, the Huda Clinic, Islamic schools, and more.

There was a presentation by a relatively new organization called Muslim Social Services, www.muslimsocialservices.com, whose mission is to extend the reach and value of social services to Muslims in Washtenaw County, Michigan. 

There was a strong fundraising effort by a young but dedicated medical student, Farhan Abdul Aziz.  He told a beautiful story of a Chinese Muslim who travelled to the United States and passed away knowing nobody, but who was able to be buried by Muslims because of the social service institutions that had been set up in the city in which she died, which drove home the vital importance of such institutions.

For more information about ISCOM, you can visit either www.islamicshuracouncil.com or www.dayofgoodness.com.  You can also contact Dr. Ayas at 248-705-9137.

12-17

Shakh Tahir Qadri’s Fatwa Against Suicide Bombing and Terrorism

April 8, 2010 by · Leave a Comment 

(Conclusion of series–part five)

Shaykh-Tahir-Qadri

Chapter 1: The Meanings of Islām

1.    Islām is a Religion of Peace and Security
2.    Three grades of Islām
i.    Research on literal meanings of Islām
ii.    Research on literal meanings of Īmān
iii.    Research on literal meanings of Ihsān

Chapter 2: Forbiddance of the Muslims’ Massacre

Section 1: Honour of the Muslims’ Life and Property

1.    The dignity of a believer is greater than Ka‘ba’s
2.    Merely pointing a weapon towards a believer is prohibited
3.    The forbiddance of the Muslims’ mass killing and violence
4.    Prohibition of killing someone accepting Islām while fighting
5.    Becoming an accomplice to terrorists too is crime
6.    Those attacking mosques are the greatest wrongdoers

Section 2: The Punishment of torturing and killing Muslims

1.    Killing a Muslim is a greater sin than destroying the whole world
2.    Killing a human is like disbelieving
3.    The massacre of Muslims is a blasphemous act
4.    Like polytheism, murder too is the greatest wrong
5.    Bloodshed is the greatest of all crimes
6.    Those burning the Muslims by explosions and other means belong to Hell
7.    Those burning the Muslims are debarred from the fold of Islām
8.    No act of worship by the murderer of a Muslim is acceptable
9.    Those who torture the Muslims will face the torment of Hell

Section 3: Suicide is a Forbidden Act

1.    Forbiddance and prohibition of suicide
2.    Paradise is forbidden to a suicider
3.    Gist of the discussion

Chapter 3: Forbiddance of the Non-Muslims’ Massacre and Torturing

1.    Killing the non-Muslim citizens is forbidden
2.    Forbiddance of killing foreign delegates and religious leaders
3.    Retribution of Muslims and non-Muslims is the same
4.    Avenging a wrong done by a non-Muslim from others is forbidden
5.    Forbiddance of looting non-Muslim citizens
6.    Humiliating non-Muslim citizens is forbidden
7.    Protection of non-Muslim citizens from internal and external aggression

Chapter 4: Forbiddance of Terrorism against the Non-Muslims even during War

1.    Prohibition of the killing of non-Muslim women
2.    Prohibition of the killing of children of non-Muslims
3.    Prohibition of the killing of the aged non-Muslims
4.    Prohibition of the killing of non-Muslim religious leaders
5.    Prohibition of the killing of non-Muslim traders and the growers
6.    Prohibition of the killing of non-Muslim service personnel
7.    Prohibition of the killing of non-Muslim non-combatants
8.    Night Offensive against non-Muslims prohibited
9.    Burning of the inhabitants of non-Muslim war areas prohibited
10.    Breaking into the enemy houses and looting forbidden
11.    Damaging the enemy cattle, crops and properties forbidden

Chapter 5: Protection of the Non-Muslims’ Lives, Properties and Worship Places

Section 1: Protection of non-Muslim citizens during the Prophetic period and the Rightly Guided Caliphs’ Era

1.    The non-Muslim citizens’ protection in the days of the Holy Prophet (blessings and peace be upon him)
2.    The legal status of the protection of non-Muslims in the days of Abū Bakr Siddiq
3.    The legal status of the protection of non-Muslims in the days of ‘Umar
4.    The legal status of the protection of non-Muslims in the days of ‘Uthmān
5.    The legal status of the protection of non-Muslims in the days of ‘Ali
6.    The legal status of the protection of non-Muslims in the days of ‘Umar ibn ‘Abd al-‘Aziz

Section 2: Forbiddance of Enforcing One’s Belief and Annihilating Worship Places

1.    Complete freedom of holding fast to one’s religion and its practice
2.    Killing a non-Muslim and destroying his property due to religious differences is forbidden
3.    Safeguard of non-Muslims’ worship places is a practice of the Holy Prophet
4.    Safeguard of non-Muslims’ worship places is obligatory
5.    Annihilation of the non-Muslims’ worship places located in Muslim majority areas is prohibited

Section 3: Rules Concerning Basic Rights of the non-Muslim Citizens in an Islamic State

Chapter 6: Rebellion against the Muslim state, Administration and Governance Forbidden

Section 1: What is rebellion and who is a rebel? (terminology, definitions and signs)

1.    Lexical definition of rebellion
2.    Technical definition of rebellion
i.    Rebellion according to Hanafi school of thought
ii.    Rebellion according to Māliki jurists
iii.    Shafi‘i’s definition of rebellion
iv.    Rebellion in view of Hanbali school of thought
v.    Ja‘fariyya definition of rebellion
vi.    The view of contemporary scholars about defining rebellion
3.    Technical definition of fight and fighters
4.    Signs of rebels

Section 2: Gravity of the crime of rebellion and its punishment

1.    Why mutiny is a grave crime?
2.    The Holy Prophet condemned development of armed grouping against the Muslim majority
3.    Warning of the torment of Hell to the agitators of rebellion
4.    Judgment against biased slogans of miscreants
5.    Killing due to sectarian differences condemnable

Section 3: Legal status of killings against a corrupt government

1.    Forbiddance of rebellion against a government not explicitly idolatrous
2.    Raising arms against Muslims is an idolatrous act
3.    The legal and constitutional way of changing a corrupt government

Section 4: Edicts by the four Imāms and other eminent authorities of Umma against terrorism and rebellion

1.    Edict by Imām A‘zam Abū Hanifa about fighting against the terrorists
2.    Edict by Imām Mālik against the terrorists
3.    Edict by Imām Shafi‘i against the terrorist rebels
4.    Action and edict by Imām Ahmad ibn Hanbal against mutiny
5.    Edict by Imām Sufyān Thawri about rebellion
6.    Imām Tahawi’s edict against armed rebellion
7.    Imām Māwardi’s edict about rebellion
8.    Imām Sarkhasi’s edict: elimination of terrorists is essential
9.    Imām Kasāi’s edict: terrorists must be killed
10.    Imām Murghaināni’s edict: war should continue until the elimination of rebellion
11.    Imām Ibn Qudāma’s edict: the mutineers are disbelievers and apostates
12.    Imām Nawawi’s edict: consensus of Companions on killing the rebels
13.    Tātārkhāniyya’s edict: cooperate with the government against the terrorists
14.    Edict by Imām Ibrāhim ibn Muflih Hanbali: war against rebels is mandatory for the government
15.    Edict by ‘Allāma Zain ad-Din ibn Nujaim
16.    Edict by ‘Allāma al-Jaziri

Section 5: Edicts by contemporary Salafi scholars against rebels

1.    Terrorists are the Khawārij of our times: Nāir ad-Din al-Albāni
2.    Declaring Muslims to be disbelievers is a sign of Khawārij: Shaykh ‘Abdu’llāh ibn Bāz
3.    Terrorists of today are a gang of the ignorant: Shaykh Sālih al-Fawzān
4.    Terroristic activities are not Jihād: Mufti Nazir Husayn of Delhi
5.    Gist of the discussion

Chapter 7: The Khawārij Strife and Contemporary Terrorists

Section 1: The advent of Khawārij strife and their beliefs and ideologies

1.    Lexical and technical meanings
2.    The Khawārij strife in the light of the Holy Qur’ān
3.    The advent of the Khawārij disruption in the days of the Holy Prophet
4.    The ideological formation of the Khawārij disruption in the period of ‘Uthmān
5.    Start of Khawārij as a movement in ‘Alawi period
6.    The beliefs and ideologies of the Khawārij
7.    The psychology and mental state of the Khawārij
8.    How Khawārij would rouse religious sentiments for mind making
9.    The conspicuous innovations of Khawārij
10.    Research work of Imām Abū Bakr al-Ājurri

Section 2: The sayings of the Messenger of Allah about the Khawārij terrorists

1.    The terrorists would appear religious
2.    The Khawārij slogan would seem true to common man
3.    The Khawārij would use adolescents for terroristic activities after brainwashing
4.    The Khawārij would appear from the east
5.    The Khwarij would keep coming until the time of False Messiah
6.    The Khawārij will be absolutely debarred from the fold of Islām
7.    The Khawārij will be the dogs of Hell
8.    The religious appearance of Khawārij must not be mistaken
9.    The Khawārij are the worst of Creation

A noteworthy point

10.    The saying of the Holy Prophet: The decree to eliminate Khawārij strife

i.    Total elimination of Khawārij is mandatory
ii.    Important expositions of hadith Imāms
iii.    The underlying reason of resemblance with the people of ‘Ad and Thamūd for the elimination of the Khawārij
iv.    Great reward for killing the Khawārij
v.    Signs of the Khawārij terrorists – collective picture

Section 3: The expositions of Imāms on mandatory killing of the Khawārij and declaring them disbelievers

Edicts of Imāms on two known statements about declaring Khawārij the disbelievers

The first statement: application of the decree of disbelief to Khawārij

1.    Imām al-Bukhāri (256 AH)
2.    Imām Ibn Jarir at-Tabari (310 AH)
3.    Imām Muhammad ibn Muhammad al-Ghazāli (505 AH)
4.    Qādi Abū Bakr ibn al-‘Arabi (543 AH)
5.    Qādi ‘Iyād al-Māliki (544 AH)
6.    Imām Abu’I-‘Abbās al-Qurtubi (656 AH)
7.    ‘Allāma Ibn Taymiyya (728 AH)
8.    Imām Taqi ad-Din as-Subki (756 AH)
9.    Imām Shātibi al-Māliki (790 AH)
10.    Imām Ibn al-Bazzāz al-Kurdari al-Hanafi (827 AH)
11.    Imām Badr ad-Din al-‘Aini al-Hanafi (855 AH)
12.    Imām Ahmad bin Muhammad al-Qastalāni (923 AH)
13.    Mullā ‘Ali al-Qāri (1014 AH)
14.    Shaykh ‘Abd al-Haqq Muhaddith of Dehli (1052 AH)
15.    Shāh ‘Abd al-‘Aziz Muhaddith of Dehli (1229 AH)
16.    ‘Allāma Ibn ‘Abidin Shāmi (1306 AH)
17.    ‘Allāma ‘Abd ar-Rahmān Mubārakpūrī (1353 AH)

The second statement: application of the decree of rebellion to Khawārij

1.    Imām A‘zam Abū Hanifa (150 AH)
2.    Imām Shams ad-Din as-Sarkhasi (483 AH)
3.    Hafiz Ibn Hajar al-‘Asqalāni (852 AH)
4.    Imām Ahmad Radā Khān (1340 AH)

Reasons of hadith Imāms about consensus on killing the Khawārij

1.    Qādi ‘Iyād al-Māliki (544 AH)

2.    ‘Allāma Ibn Taymiyya (728 AH)
3.    Hafiz Ibn Hajar al-‘Asqalāni (728 AH)

Great reward for the troops fighting against the Khawārij terrorists

4.    Ibn Habirah

The standpoint of ‘Allāma Anwar Shāh Kashmiri and ‘Allāma Shabbir Ahmad ‘Uthmāni about the Khawārij

Section 4: Today’s terrorists are Khawārij

1.    Condemnation of the supporters of Khawārij
2.    Research work by Ibn Taymiyya about perpetuation of Khawārij
3.    The terrorists are the Khawārij of our times
4.    Important juristic issue: calling Khawārij as terrorists is based on the Qur’ān and Sunna, not independent reasoning

Chapter 8: Peaceful Way of Struggle in a Muslim State

1.    The Qur’ānic command to bid good and forbid evil
Collective struggle for commanding good and forbidding evil
2.    The command to bid good and forbid evil in Prophetic traditions
Three grades of preventing evil
The meaning of preventing evil physically
3.    Political and democratic struggle against injustice and oppression

Chapter 9: Call for Reflection and Reformation

IFANCA responds to rumors about halal certification at Cargill/Better Beef Plant

July 23, 2009 by · 1 Comment 

By Ayub Khan, MMNS

CHICAGO, IL— In response to rumors circulating in USA, Canada as well as on the internet, the Islamic Food and Nutrition Council of America [IFANCA]  has issued a statement assuring  halal consumers and retailers that all its certified products meet the strictest of Halal criteria and can be consumed without any doubt.

“IFANCA’s procedures have been approved by a team of Islamic scholars and scientists who have developed a very stringent & independently verifiable halal authentication system, in all of its certified plants including Cargill’s Better Beef Plant. IFANCA’s slaughter methods are as close as practically possible to the traditional Islamic method of slaughter, where at least three out of four vessels are precisely cut, while also meeting the Canadian food safety requirements. 

All cattle are slaughtered by specially trained Muslim slaughter men, who are supervised by IFANCA inspectors, the statement reads.

The press release states that the claims by a group which say that the IFANCA approved animal slaughter method do not meet the Islamic criteria are untrue. 

The group in a blog posting suggests that the vertical method of cut during the animal slaughter does not meet the Islamic criteria and that it goes against the scholarly consensus.

To the above allegation IFANCA replied, “First the cut at the Cargill/Better Beef plant is not vertical cut. It is modified horizontal cut. Secondly, The claim about the jurists being unanimous is baseless. There are several methods of slaughtering animals, generally practiced being cutting the throat to sever  four (4) passages, trachea, esophagus, jugular veins and carotid arteries. There is disagreement among the scholars even with the required number of openings to be cut. According to Imam Abu Hanifa all four are required to be cut. (Badai Al Sanaih, 6/41). According to his student Imam Abu Yusuf only one of the two jugular veins are required to be cut besides that of throat and windpipe. (ibid).  According to other scholars only cutting of the throat and windpipe is enough. (Sharh Muhazzab, 9/84). According to Imam Malik the windpipe and the two jugular veins are required to be cut in order for the animal to be halal. (Sharh Al Sagheer, 2/154). According to another reference, the Hanafi School’s ruling is that at least three of the four openings should be cut. (Nasab ul Raya, 4/185-86).  [This requirement of cutting at least three passages as well as complete draining of blood are met at the Cargill/Better Beef plant].”

“ The slaughter men trained by IFANCA are especially instructed in cutting the required number of openings leaving no doubt about this method of halal slaughter. Hence Cargill/Better Beef is halal and zabiha, as has been certified for over 10 years by the Islamic Food and Nutrition Council of America,” the statement reads.

11-31