Helping Hand (USA) Signs MoU with Medical Bridges Inc.

April 14, 2011 by · Leave a Comment 

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U. S. South Central Region Coordinator for the Helping Hand (USA) in Houston, ILyas Hasan Choudry; President, CEO of Medical Bridges Dorothy Bolettieri…

Dorothy Bolettieri, President, CEO of Medical Bridges; Steve Bolfing; Steven Bolfing, Business Development Manager; and Kourtnei Ramirez, Special Projects Coordinator for Medical Bridges…

The Helping Hand (USA) For Relief & Development has signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with Houston based Medical Bridges, Inc., according to which between April and December 2011, Helping Hand (USA) will be sending to several countries, where most needed; ten large 40-Feet containers of medical equipment and supplies provided by Medical Bridges. Total shipment will be approximately 3-to-4 million dollars.

Tentatively the beneficiary countries will include Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Haiti, and Pakistan. Also there is a chance to include the historical city of “Caravan” in Tunisia as one of the places for a container (determination on this will soon be made).

In a statement, the U. S. South Central Region Coordinator for the Helping Hand (USA) in Houston, ILyas Hasan Choudry has said: “Helping Hand (USA) in partnership with Medical Bridges will send donated good quality medical equipment and supplies of 3-to-4 million dollars worth. Hundreds and thousands of less fortunate brothers and sisters in humanity will benefit from this effort and several lives will be saved. All of these people will remember in their prayers the patrons, supporters, donors, volunteers, and staff of Helping Hand (USA). I want to appeal to all the blessed persons to whole-heartedly contribute towards the Helping Hand’s discretionary fund by visiting www.HHRD.Org

At a simple occasion at the office of Medical Bridges, the U. S. South Central Region Coordinator for the Helping Hand (USA) For Relief & Development, ILyas Hasan Choudry; and Dorothy Bolettieri, President and CEO of Medical Bridges; signed the MoU documents. Also present were Steven Bolfing, Business Development Manager; and Kourtnei Ramirez, Special Projects Coordinator for Medical Bridges.

In a communiqué to Helping Hand at the eve of signing of the MoU, Dorothy Bolettieri of Medical Bridges wrote: “I’m delighted that the MOU has been approved and that we will work together to help improve the health-care delivery in areas that so desperately need support and assistance.”

Steven Bolfing wrote: “Medical Bridges would not be able to assist humanity without organizations such as yours (Helping Hand USA).”

Talking to our media representative, ILyas Hasan Choudry has said: “We are really appreciative of the efforts and services of Medical Bridges towards the overall health of the humanity. We are extremely delighted to partner with them. By the Grace of God, this effort will save many lives; and in our faith it has been informed to us in Quran that if we will save the lives of one person, it is as if we have saved the lives of the whole humanity.”

Other than this, Helping Hand (USA) will also be sending from their headquarter in Detroit, Michigan; large 40-Feet containers of medical equipments’ and supplies’ provided by the World Medical Relief of Michigan.

Helping Hand (USA) also has their own In-Kind Donation Centers in Ontario California; Houston Texas; Sanford Florida; Ijamsville Maryland; Somerset New Jersey; and Bay Shore New York; where medical equipments’ & supplies’; household, fresh non-perishable food, & hygiene items; new clothes, comforters, blankets, jackets; and many other things are accepted on almost daily basis.
Addresses and phone numbers of these In-Kind Donation Centers can be found at www.HHRD.Org

Other than of course these material donations, Helping Hand (USA) is requesting to monetarily support this In-Kind Donation Program by contributing towards the Helping Hand (USA) Discretionary Fund at www.HHRD.Org – This way the patrons of Helping Hand (USA) will receive the most necessary prayers of hundreds and thousands, whose lives will be saved and bettered by this useful program.

For more information, one can call 1-832-275-0786 or 1-888-808-HELP(4357).

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Hand

May 13, 2010 by · Leave a Comment 

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A hand is a prehensile, multi-fingered body part located at the end of an arm or forelimb of primates and some other vertebrates.

Hands are the chief organs for physically manipulating the environment, used for both gross motor skills (such as grasping a large object) and fine motor skills (such as picking up a small pebble). The fingertips contain some of the densest areas of nerve endings on the body, are the richest source of tactile feedback, and have the greatest positioning capability of the body; thus the sense of touch is intimately associated with hands. Like other paired organs (eyes, ears, legs), each hand is dominantly controlled by the opposing brain hemisphere, and thus handedness, or preferred hand choice for single-handed activities such as writing with a pen, reflects a significant individual trait.

Humans have two hands located at the distal end of each arm. Apes and monkeys are sometimes described as having four hands, because the toes are long and the hallux is opposable and looks more like a thumb, thus enabling the feet to be used as hands. Also, some apes have toes that are longer than human fingers.

The movements of the human hand are accomplished by two sets tissues. They can be subdivided into two groups: the extrinsic and intrinsic muscle groups. The extrinsic muscle groups are the long flexors and extensors. They are called extrinsic because the muscle belly is located on the forearm.

The intrinsic muscle groups are the thenar and hypothenar muscles (thenar referring to the thumb, hypothenar to the small finger), the interossei muscles (between the metacarpal bones, four dorsally and three volarly) and the lumbrical muscles. These muscles arise from the deep flexor (and are special because they have no bony origin) and insert on the dorsal extensor hood mechanism.

The fingers have two long flexors, located on the underside of the forearm. They insert by tendons to the phalanges of the fingers. The deep flexor attaches to the distal phalanx, and the superficial flexor attaches to the middle phalanx. The flexors allow for the actual bending of the fingers. The thumb has one long flexor and a short flexor in the thenar muscle group. The human thumb also has other muscles in the thenar group (opponens and abductor brevis muscle), moving the thumb in opposition, making grasping possible.

The extensors are on the back of the forearm and are connected in a more complex way than the flexors to the dorsum of the fingers. They straighten out the digits.

The thumb has two extensors in the forearm; the tendons of these form the anatomical snuff box. Also, the index finger and the little finger have an extra extensor, used for instance for pointing. The extensors are situated within 6 separate compartments. The 1st compartment contains abductor pollicis longus and extensor pollicis brevis. The 2nd compartment contains extensors carpi radialis longus and brevis. The 3rd compartment contains extensor pollicis longus. The extensor digitorum indicis and extensor digititorum communis are within the 4th compartment. Extensor digiti minimi is in the fifth, and extensor carpi ulnaris is in the 6th.

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Examining the Evil Eye

April 8, 2010 by · Leave a Comment 

By Sumayyah Meehan MMNS Middle East Correspondent

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The hamsa (also called a hamesh, Hand of Fatima, Hand of Miriam, or Hand of God) is an ancient Middle Eastern symbol for protection from the evil eye.

You woke up to a flat tire in the morning. You spilled a steaming hot coffee on your leg on your morning drive to work. A large tree branch fell on you as you took a stroll on a sidewalk. Most people would chalk these events up to mere coincidence or simply a bout of bad luck. But a trip across the ocean to the Middle East reveals that it is a whole other ball game.

Often labeled ‘fatalists’ by the heavily biased western media it’s true that most Muslims in the Middle East,as well as the rest of the world, put their lives wholeheartedly in the hands of God. However, for Arab Muslims there is an equally intense belief in the ‘evil eye’ and a plethora of preventative measures to ward it off, depending on the culture. In a nutshell, the evil eye basically means that someone covets something that you have and thus taints it. Soon after you, or the aforementioned item, typically faces some sort of calamity. It’s not uncommon for every ill to befall someone to be intensely scrutinized to find the exact moment that the evil eye contaminated it.

For this reason, amulets of various sorts adorn objects that would otherwise be left ‘unprotected’. It’s not uncommon to see brand new, or even passably nice, sports cars with decals in Arabic that read, “In the name of God” or “Praise God”. Other places for the amulets to reside include the front doors of apartments and mansions, sometimes in every room of the house. Even newborn babies often are adorned with a small gold brooch on their night suits with the words “In the Name of God” before they are brought out to visitors. The concept is to basically ensure that someone recognizes the gift the person possesses as coming from God before they can desire it.

To the person unfamiliar with Islam, it might seem like a whole lot of hocus-pocus. But the evil eye is a reality that is mentioned in the Holy Quran and something that the Prophet Muhammad (s) himself was very well acquainted with. The recommendation from the Sunnah of Muhammad (s) is to recite certain verses from the Holy Quran and to pray for sincere protection from God Almighty. For many Muslims, just the thought of the evil eye is enough to send a cold shudder right down the spine.

As a result, some clever opportunists have seized the opportunity to make a profit off the fear and suffering of others. In most of the Gulf countries there exists some people, who by all appearances are extremely religious, who claim to be specialists in treating the effects of the evil eye. Many offer their services albeit for a price. Most charge cash money for reciting verses of the Holy Quran over the afflicted person while others will recite the Quran for free so long as the person purchases one of their homemade homeopathic remedies. Since the belief in the evil eye is so widespread, and the people seeking to profit from it even wider, authorities can not do much to eradicate the supposed remedy which is often much more evil than the cause.

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Rice

August 27, 2009 by · Leave a Comment 

tufail 11-36 The starchy grain of this plant, used as a staple food throughout the world.

* Prior to planting, minimal soil manipulation is needed to prepare for cultivation. If the rice will be grown on a hilly terrain, the area must be leveled into terraces. Paddies are leveled and surrounded by dikes or levees with the aide of earth-moving equipment. Then, the fields are plowed before planting. In the United States, rice is most often planted on river deltas and plowing is accomplished with a disk plow, an off-set disk plow, or a chisel. Adequate irrigation of the terrace or river delta bed is required and accomplished by leveling and by controlling water with pumps, reservoirs, ditches, and streams.

* Rice seeds are soaked prior to planting.

* Depending on the level of mechanization and the size of the planting, seeding occurs in three ways. In many Asian countries that haven’t mechanized their farming practices, seeds are sown by hand. After 30-50 days of growth, the seedlings are transplanted in bunches from nursery beds to flooded paddies. Seeds can also be sown using a machine called a drill that places the seed in the ground. Larger enterprises often found in the United States sow rice seed by airplane. Low-flying planes distribute seed onto already flooded fields. An average distribution is 90-100 lb per acre (101-111 kg per hectare), creating roughly 15-30 seedlings per square foot.

* Once the plants have reached full growth (approximately three months after planting) and the grains begin to ripen—the tops begin to droop and the stem yellows—the water is drained from the fields. As the fields dry, the grains ripen further and harvesting is commenced.

* Depending on the size of the operation and the amount of mechanization, rice is either harvested by hand or machine. By hand, rice stalks are cut by sharp knives or sickles. This practice still occurs in many Asian countries. Rice can also be harvested by a mechanized hand harvester or by a tractor/horse-drawn machine that cuts and stacks the rice stalks. In the US, most operations use large combines to harvest and thresh—separate the grain from the stalk—the rice stalks.

* If the rice has been harvested by hand or by a semi-automated process, threshing is completed by flailing the stalks by hand or by using a mechanized thresher.

* Before milling, rice grains must be dried with artificially heated air or, more often, with the help of naturally occurring sunshine. Rice grains are left on racks in fields to dry out naturally. Once dried, the rice grain, now called rough rice, is ready for processing.

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