Nutrition

November 17, 2011 by · Leave a Comment 

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A diagrammatic guide to daily eating (figure 27a). The food guide pyramid has been adopted by the US Department of Agriculture and the Department of Health and Human Services to encourage people to eat healthily. Six major groups of food are arranged in a pyramid shape to indicate the number of recommended daily servings of each group: the food group with the highest number of recommended daily servings (bread, cereal, and pasta group) form the base of the pyramid; the group with the lowest recommended number of servings (fats, oils, and sweets) form the apex of the pyramid. The guidelines are for the average person. All active people should have at least the lowest number of servings recommended for each food group. Very active people, especially serious athletes and those in physically demanding jobs, may need more than the larger number of recommended servings.

In the UK an alternative diagrammatic guide to the food guide pyramid has been introduced. It is called the ‘plate model’ (figure 27b). This diagram takes the form of a plate divided into five sections representing the main food groups: bread, other cereals, and potatoes; milk and dairy foods; fatty and sugary foods; meat, fish, and alternatives; and fruit and vegetables. Market research found that the public preferred this approach to the pyramid.

The Pyramid includes five major food groups, each of which provides nutrients needed for good health. By making healthful choices within these food groups, like selecting low-fat and high-fiber foods, people can promote good health and reduce their risk of disease. The placement of foods within the Pyramid shows that foods of plant origin should supply most of the servings of food in the daily diet.

The Breads, Cereals, Rice, and Pasta Group forms the base of the Pyramid, with the largest number of servings recommended (six to eleven servings recommended daily). The next layer up includes the Fruit Group (two to four servings) and the Vegetable Group (three to five servings). At the third level are the Milk, Yogurt, and Cheese Group (two to three servings) and the Meat, Poultry, Fish, Dry Beans, Eggs, and Nuts Group (two to three servings). At the tip of the Pyramid are Fats, Oils, and Sweets. These foods and food ingredients should be used “sparingly” to avoid excess calories and/or fat. It is not necessary to completely avoid foods such as salad dressing, butter, margarine, candy, soft drinks, and sweet desserts, but they should be consumed infrequently.

The Pyramid includes symbols that represent the fats and added sugars found in foods. These are most concentrated at the tip of the Pyramid, but are also found in foods from the five major food groups. This reveals that some foods within the five food groups are high in fat and/or sugar. People can limit their fat and sugar intake, as suggested by the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, by selecting foods low in fat and added sugars most of the time.

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The Summer Sizzle

June 23, 2011 by · Leave a Comment 

By Sumayyah Meehan, TMO

sun-sky-lg-ua4ksuLast summer was one of the hottest on record for many parts of the Middle East with Kuwait having one of the most scorching summers ever. Forget about frying an egg on the sidewalk, in Kuwait you could roast an entire chicken on a garden wall or even a park bench. During the peak hours of the day, when the desert sun is at its most unforgiving peak, the streets of Kuwait are deserted leaving an entire nation looking like a ghost town. There really is not a whole lot to do outdoors when the mercury exceeds 100F and often reaches well above 115F. So where does everyone go?

For many of the denizens of Kuwait, hanging out in a heavily air-conditioned mall or catching Hollywood’s latest offering at a perfectly chilled movie theater complete with snacks is the best way to beat the scorching summer heat. For a very brave minority, who are willing to brave the heat, there are a limited number of water activities to engage in. Jet skiing and swimming, in the somewhat cool waters of Kuwait, are the top summer activities for adults and children alike. Many families wait until the sun goes down to hit the beaches of Kuwait and often spend the evening frolicking in the ocean despite there being limited lighting, no lifeguards on duty and razor sharp rocks just at the water’s edge.

One of the greatest pastimes during the summers in Kuwait is simply spending the day indoors at home. It might sound boring, but with a veritable smorgasbord of companies catering to people lounging around at home, the phrase “cabin fever” is meaningless. In Kuwait you can have just about anything, including the kitchen sink, delivered right to your door. Groceries, fresh fruit and vegetables as well as donuts, pastries and ice cream are just a few of the edible items available for delivery. Electronic goods, designer perfumes, Swiss chocolates, high-end toiletries and even home appliances are some of the others.

For people wanting just a little bit more pampering and luxury in the comfort of their own home, without any of the fuss, teams of caterers will arrive at the door to cater a party or even prepare an elaborate barbeque right in the backyard. There is even a new delivery service available that provides “shisha” pipes for use at home complete with a server to light the charcoal. And if that’s not enough, why not have a team of manicurists and masseuses come over to pamper everyone in the home?

The summers may be hot in Kuwait, and while they absolutely do force a mass exodus of travelers who are seeking cooler temperatures, those left behind can still enjoy a little bit of luxury without even setting foot outdoors.

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