Mumbai Terror Survivor Embraces Islam

October 22, 2009 by · Leave a Comment 

Islamnewsroom.com

NEW YORK – An American Catholic and survivor of a terrorist attack in Mumbai, India last November overcame hatred and opened his mind to learn and discover Islam and becomes a Muslim.

Dennis O’Brien Survivor of Mumbai Terror Attack ACCEPTS ISLAM

Dennis O’Brien, a Catholic, wanted to comprehend the basis of faith of people accused of committing the attack in Mumbai. He discovered in fact, the gunmen were certainly not following Islam at all. In fact, anyone who might take the time to open their eyes, open their minds and open their hearts would have to come to the very same conclusion.

Sunday, just after Eid salat and standing before a crowd of thousands, Dennis O’Brien embraced Islam.

He declared.. ..his belief – “There is only one God and the Prophet Muhammad is his last messenger”.

O’Brien, who heads up the education committee of St Anthony’s Catholic Church in Wilmington, Delaware, says this was a surprise, even to him. But said he was at peace with it.

“Today I feel free of sin,” he remarked.

After several months of studies and asking questions of Muslim friends and associates, “I feel comfort in Islam,” he said.

O’Brien also said he wanted to express solidarity with Muslims, even though extremists who say they practice the faith “tried to kill me”.

Pastor John McGinley, of St Anthony’s, said Sunday he had not heard of O’Brien’s embrace of Islam. McGinley said he knew O’Brien is inquisitive and has expressed concern about the young men involved in the Mumbai attacks.

He would not say if the declaration of another faith would affect O’Brien’s position at the church, noting he had not spoken to him about Sunday’s events. “I think this is part of his journey of faith and we can work with that,” McGinley said.

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Wood Burning Stoves

October 22, 2009 by · Leave a Comment 

tufail

As early as Roman times stoves made of clay, tile, or earthenware were in use in central and N Europe. Early Swiss stoves of clay or brick, without chimneys, were built against the outer house wall, with an opening to the outside through which they were fueled and through which the smoke could escape. Scarcity of fuel made an economical heat-retaining device necessary, and these primitive stoves, built of clay, brick, tile, or plastered masonry, became common in the Scandinavian countries, Holland, Germany, and N France. Some exquisitely colored and glazed tile stoves, dating from the 16th and 17th cent., show traces of Moorish influence. In Russia large brick stoves formed a partition between two rooms. Because of the very long flue, which wound back and forth inside the structure, these could be heated for some hours with a small amount of light fuel.

The Franklin stove, invented in 1743 and used for heating, was the lineal descendant of the fireplace, being at first only a portable down-draft iron fireplace that could be set into, or before, the chimney.

It was soon elaborated into what was known as the Pennsylvania fireplace, with a grate and sliding doors. In common use for a period after the Revolution, it was followed by a variety of heaters burning wood and coal. The base burner, or magazine coal heater, was widely used before the general adoption of central heating.

Heating devices that we would call stoves had long been in existence, going back to Roman times. However, the stove as the chief cooking device, taking the place of the fireplace, dates only to around the mid-19th century with the widespread use of wood-burning or coal-burning cooking stoves stove, device used for heating or for cooking food. The stove was long regarded as a cooking device supplementary to the fireplace, near which it stood; its stovepipe led into the fireplace chimney. It was not until about the middle of the 19th cent., when the coal-burning range with removable lids came into general use, that the fireplace was finally supplanted as the chief cooking agency.

A cast-iron stove made in China before A.D. 200 has been found, but it was not until late in the 15th cent. that cast-iron stoves were first made in Europe. These consisted of plates that were grooved to fit together in the shape of a box. Probably the earliest of this type were earthenware stoves enclosed in iron castings decorated with biblical scenes and armorial and arabesque designs. They often bore inscriptions in Norse, German, Dutch, French, or sometimes Latin, and some were dated. Many were highly artistic specimens of handicraft. A typical early iron stove is the wall-jamb, or five-plate, stove, which was fueled from an adjoining room.

Dutch, Swedish, and German settlers of the American colonies, especially those of Delaware, Pennsylvania, and New Jersey, brought with them five-plate stoves or molds for casting them. Iron founding began c.1724 in America, and old forges or foundries have left records of five-plate stoves sold in 1728 as Dutch stoves or, less commonly, carved stoves. These continued to be made until Revolutionary times, when they were superseded by the English, or 10-plate, stove, which stood free of the wall and had a draft or fuel door. These 10-plate devices could cook and warm at the same time and replaced, in part, the large masonry baking oven, usually built outside the house.

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Community News (V11-I36)

August 27, 2009 by · Leave a Comment 

Airmen & families celebrate Ramadan

By 1st Lt. Joe Kreidel

18th Wing Public Affairs

8/24/2009 – KADENA AIR BASE, Japan  — “It’s like planning for Christmas while everyone else is going about their business,” said Tech. Sgt. Angela Errahimi, a combat communications chief with the 909th Air Refueling Squadron, about preparing for Ramadan here. This same sense of dislocation is no doubt shared by many military members celebrating Ramadan in places like Okinawa where Islam is by far a minority religion.

Ramadan, which began Aug. 22, is a 30-day fast during which devout Muslims abstain from food, drink, and sex from sunrise to sunset. Ramadan is the preeminent ritual in a faith that gives particular importance to its ritual observances.

“Islam was something I was looking for – the mosque was so quiet and peaceful,” said Sergeant Errahimi of her conversion six years ago. After meeting her now-husband, who is from Morocco, she studied at a mosque for one year prior to making her “shahada” or witness of faith.

It was Islam’s structure and emphasis on community that first appealed to Staff Sgt. Marvin Morris, an X-ray technician and the assistant NCOIC of radiology at the 18th Medical Operations Squadron. He called the daily regimen of five scheduled prayers “the military version of prayer.”

“The first few days of fasting are hard,” said Sergeant Morris. At Travis Air Force Base, Calif., where he was previously stationed, several non-Muslim friends attempted to join him in the fast; one friend made it one whole day. For Sergeant Morris, it’s in large part the hardship of fasting that makes Ramadan so special: “That’s what it’s about. It’s a cleansing process, a chance to focus inward and renew your commitment to Allah.”

The day’s perseverance is rewarded come sunset, as “Iftar” – the evening meal at which each day’s fast is broken – tends to be an extravagant affair. For a week leading up to Ramadan, Sergeant Errahimi and her husband, who have four children at home, prepared various dishes and pastries so as to have a stockpile once Ramadan actually began. Food preparation, too, is more difficult and requires more planning in Okinawa than in Washington, D.C., where the Errahimis lived previously. “Halal” meats are especially hard to come by.

Ramadan will conclude Sept. 19 with “Eid,” a major festival that traditionally involves a special public prayer, feasting, gift-giving, and visiting with family and friends. This communal, festive aspect of Ramadan may be somewhat lacking for Sgt. Morris this year, as he’s new to the island and hasn’t yet made many friends amongst the on-island Muslim community, miniscule compared to the one in northern California.

In 2007, Sergeant Morris celebrated Ramadan at Bagram Airfield in Afghanistan. While there he worked the night shift, convenient because it allowed him to sleep during the day when he couldn’t eat or drink. On multiple occasions he was able take “Iftar” with a group of Egyptian Muslims working in Afghanistan. “I loved it,” he said, “It’s a different culture, but we’re connected by our shared faith. It’s like a family away from family.”

NC Mosque hit by hate crime

TAYLOR, NC– A mosque in Taylors has been victim of a hate crime. The words ‘Death to Muslims’ were carved in a concrete outside the Islamic Center.

The anti-religious message was written sometime in the early morning hours last Saturday.  For members like Miriam Abbad, it’s hard to see.  She’s worshipped for 10 years at the center.  “When they say death to Muslims, that means me, my young children, my husband, my whole family.  What did we do wrong to deserve such mean words to come out?”

The FBI is investigating the case.

Delaware Muslim prof. network

A new service-based organization has formed with the goal of inviting Muslims to participate in activities that benefit the community.

The Muslim Professionals of Delaware began last month and is working on its first project, a drive to collect school supplies for disadvantaged children.

Group founders Semab Chaudhry and Ahmed Sharkawy, said they want to work with interfaith groups to help the needy, foster greater cultural understanding and hold career and college development workshops.

Anyone interested in joining or working with the group can visit www.mpod.us.com or e-mail info@mpod.us.com.

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Azeez Ali Named Assistant Coach at IPFW

August 20, 2009 by · Leave a Comment 

Azeez Ali FORT WAYNE, IN–Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne (IPFW) has announced the addition of Azeez Ali to its men’s basketball coaching staff.

Ali just completed his second season on John Shulman’s staff at The University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. He served as the Director of Basketball Operations and managed travel, film exchange and the support staff.

“I’m excited to be here, excited to work with Coach Fife and his staff, and am very thankful for the opportunity,” Ali said.  “Hopefully I can contribute and be part of Coach Fife’s vision for winning the Summit League. I’d also like to thank Coach Shulman for the opportunity he provided me at UTC.”

“Azeez brings a wealth of experience and a winning mentality to our program,” Fife said.  “’Z’ has won at every level, including an NCAA berth with Chattanooga this past season.  He will be really good with our young guys as well as on the road recruiting.  We are very pleased to have him become part of our program.”

Ali helped lead the Mocs to the 2009 Southern Conference (SoCon) crown.  Before landing in Chattanooga, Ali worked at Cecil Community College (2005-07) in North East, Md. His duties included advance scouting and serving as the recruiting assistant. CCC had a record of 66-5 during his tenure. It won the 2006 NJCAA Division II National Championship and finished fifth in 2005, while also capturing two Maryland state championships and two region titles.

Ali is a native of Wilmington, Delaware. He helped lead Howard H.S. to the Blue Hen Conference title and the state final four in 2000. He is a 2004 graduate of Maryland-Eastern Shore with a degree in Business Administration.  He will graduate in December with a master’s degree in Special Education from UTC.

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Community News (V11-I34)

August 13, 2009 by · Leave a Comment 

Islamic Summer Fest held in Delaware

WILMINGTON, DE–The first Islamic Summer Festival was held in Ogletown, Delaware. The event had a number of sports, rides, games, food and other activities. It was held in the parking lot of Masjid Ibrahim.

Proceeds from the event will help the Islamic Society of Delaware build a private school that will be open to all, not just students who practice Islam, organizers said.

“We wanted to open up our place of worship to people of all religions. We are trying to become more integrated into the community,” said Vaqar Sharief, president of the Islamic Society of Delaware. Sharief said the group wanted to send a message to the community that Muslims are good neighbors who welcome all. Another goal is to help people coming from other countries to the Delaware area get acclimated.

“This is a way to help you develop faster when you come, so you won’t become isolated,” Sharief said. “Unity is a big deal.”

NYPD reaches out to Muslims for Ramadan

NEW YORK,NY–In an annual pre-Ramadan meeting, city police officers, religious leaders and community members gathered Monday to discuss steps to ensure a safe holiday.

The NYPD says more foot patrols, special patrol cars, increased presence at mosques and greater communication with the Muslim community will all be in place.
“Across the police department we continue our work to familiarize all our police officers with the Islamic faith,” Police Commissioner Ray Kelly said. “We do this with the help of special training videos to mosques and meetings such as this one.”

“Commissioner Kelly did a good job to keep it a tradition, a relationship between the police department and the Muslim community,” said Ahmed Jamil of the Muslim American Society of Queens. “We encourage this. And it has to be developed a little bit more. But it’s a good start.”

Kelly also eased concerns of profiling saying they are not monitoring any communities, including Muslim communities.

Fl religious leaders urge action on health reform

ORLANDO, FL– An Imam in Central Florida joined Christian priests and a Rabbi in urging the government to make affordable health care for all families in the country. Imam Muhammad Musri of the Islamic Society, Bishop Thomas Wenski, Rabbi Gary Perras, and Rev. Priscilla Robinson issued a joint statement urging the same.

“In Islam we are told all human life is precious and equal, therefore it is time for our nation to realize this fundamental right for all of it’s citizens,” Imam Musri said.

To further promote their agenda the faith leaders will gather on August 20 for a health care forum at Good Shepherd Catholic Church.

Airport chapel caters to all faiths

ATLANTA,GA–The chapel at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport now caters to a number of faiths including Islam. The 1,040 square foot chapel which recently underwent a renovation has doubled to its current size.

About 1,500 people per week visit the chapel, a fraction of the 250,000 people who pass through the world’s busiest airport each day.The chapel remains unadorned to maintain its interfaith feel.

Saginaw Township approves mosque

SAGINAW, MI–Saginaw Township Supervisor Tim Braun expects the Saginaw-based Islamic Center to be a good neighbor for the community once a 14,000 square foot plus mosque is completed, some time next year.  The Township board unanimously approved the proposed special use permit for the site on North Center north of McCarty near Tittabawassee.

Braun and other Township officials explained to the nearly 70 people in attendance at the board meeting that the Islamic Center met all zoning requirements. Islamic Center officials say the design will not include exterior loud speakers for the Azan.

Bronx Muslims targets of attacks

BRONX, NY–The West African Muslim community in Bronx is calling on authorities to seriously tackle a wave of hate crimes. There have been twenty such attacks on members of the community within the past one year. They are now seeking help from the NYPD and Housing Authority.

“We are calling everyone to come and help us to address these issues. And these are not things that will be accepted and tolerated,” Said Ebrahim Dawood Ndure of the African Action Network in an interview to the NY1 news channel.

Last week a community forum was held with members of NYPD, NYCHA, and District Attorney Robert Johnson in attendance.

Johnson said the authorities are seriously looking at the problem and the perpetrators will be prosecuted.

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