Nicolas Anelka Says He Is Happy at Chelsea

September 22, 2011 by · Leave a Comment 

Compiled by Parvez Fatteh, Founder of http://sportingummah.com, sports@muslimobserver.com

ANELKA_N_20020824_NF_LReports surfaced again this week that French Muslim footballer Nicolas Anelka was close to signing with a Major League Soccer (MLS) team in the United States this past summer and is still interested in joining the league. His current club, Chelsea Football Club of the English Premier League, published quotes from the Anelka on its website stating his desire to remain with the Premier League team.
“I am linked everywhere but – when you are linked – it doesn’t mean you want to leave,” Anelka told the website. “I like Chelsea and first of all wanted to stay that’s why I am still here.”

The 32-year-old striker’s contract runs out next summer and current manager Andre Villas-Boas has hinted that this may indeed be Anelka’s last year with the club. “I am happy here, I like the club, everyone here, and, after, I will see what happens. It is not only down to me,” Anelka told the club’s website regarding a possible transfer in either the winter or summer transfer windows. “I have been here almost four years now, and I am pleased with the way it has been. It could have been even better but I am still happy.”

Anelka was reportedly close to signing with an MLS franchise located on the West Coast, according to one of his agents. Although a deal never materialized, Anelka’s camp confirmed to the website Goal.com that their client is still interested in moving to the North American league. “I can confirm that Nicolas is still possibly interested in pursuing an MLS career,” said Michael Wiesenfeld, who is part of European Football Group, an organization which will represent Anelka’s marketing rights should he join MLS. “He got very close to landing a nice contract with a team on the West Coast in August. He also has opportunities elsewhere in the world.”

Anelka originally joined  Chelsea from Bolton inn January of 2008 for 15 million pounds. He has made 344 appearances in the Premier League and scored 123 goals to date for Arsenal, Liverpool, Bolton and Chelsea. But Chelsea’s abundance of scoring forwards, and Anelka’s advancing age, make him more expendable than ever. And with his career with the French national team likely over, a period with MLS would likely be Anelka’s swan song.

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Samir Nasri Goes to Manchester City

August 25, 2011 by · Leave a Comment 

By Parvez Fatteh, TMO, Founder of http://sportingummah.com, sports@muslimobserver.com

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The Sheikh of Abu Dhabi has been trying to secure this deal all summer, and he finally got his man. Manchester City football club of the English Premier League have finally secured the services of French Muslim footballer Samir Nasri from his former club, fellow English League rivals Arsenal.

The Abu Dhabi-owned football club reportedly obtained Nasri for a transfer fee of £24million. The 24-year-old midfielder subsequently signed a four year contract with Manchester City. This would be the fourth major signing this summer for City, but it would only be the second most expensive, after the club record £38million purchase of Sergio Aguero. Nasri will likely make his Man City debut this Sunday against Tottenham.

Nasri had just one year remaining on his contract at Arsenal, whom he joined in 2008, and the London club have agreed to sell now rather than risk losing him on a free transfer next summer. English Premier League rivals Manchester United had also shown interested in the Frenchman. And in recent weeks, there was growing tension at Arsenal with the common knowledge that Nasri wanted out. Arsenal manager Arsene Wenger even included Nasri in the starting lineup this past weekend against Liverpool even after it was apparent that the club was close to a sale. He was, however, left off of the roster for Arsenal’s midweek Champions League qualifying match against Udinese.

This was a rough week for Arsenal, who were forced to sell captain Cesc Fabregas to Barcelona the week before, followed by a home loss to Liverpool. Now they have been strong-armed into parting with another of their young talents.

Nasri came up in the Marseille youth system and made his debut for the French club at the age of 17. He came to Arsenal in 2008 for £15.8million. But he struggled for a couple of years, and was even left off of the 2010 French World Cup team. But he finally broke through last year with 15 goals and a nomination for Professional Footballers’ Association Player of the Year.

Manchester City manager, Roberto Mancini told www.mcfc.co.uk: “He’s a fantastic player because he has technique, he has mentality. I knew him when he played for Marseille. I followed him when I was at Inter and we wanted to take him five years ago. But I think in the last few years in the Premier League he’s improved a lot. Now I think he’s a top player.”

Nasri now joins a Muslim-laden squad in Manchester City. The Ivorian brothers Kolo and Yaya Toure are there, as well as fellow Ivorian Abdul Razak, and Somalian midfielder Abdisalam Ibrahim, not to mention the Emirati ownership.

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Tips on Negotiating a Sound Physician Agreement

August 18, 2011 by · Leave a Comment 

By Adil Daudi, Esq.

I was recently invited to speak at the Michigan State University Radiology Department, in front of their Residents, on a topic that is very much overlooked by new physicians, or even experienced physicians: Understanding their employment agreement.

StethiscopeMore and more physicians entering into their profession are ignoring some of basic concepts that come with their agreement. However, there is always one clause that is never ignored – their salary. While the complexity and details of a contract can vary with depending on the employer and location, certain clauses must always be addressed. This article will illustrate the three (3) primary areas of concern that every physician, whether new or experienced, should take into consideration when negotiating their Physician Employment Agreement.

Non-Compete Agreements:

A non-compete agreement is a restriction placed on you that bars you from practicing with competitors within a specific geographic area and within a specific period of time. Two factors that should be considered: (a) Whether the state you are working in enforces non-compete agreements (Michigan does as of 1987); and (b) if your state does, are the restrictions placed on you reasonable.

In order to determine reasonableness, courts have laid out three (3) elements: (1) Geographic area; (2) Duration; and (3) Market Description.

Geographic area: In Michigan, courts have established that a 50-mile radius is deemed reasonable. Therefore, if you are terminated from your employment and you are seeking employment, anything within 50-miles from your previous employer will be unacceptable.

Duration: Case law has also established that anywhere between 18-24 months is considered a reasonable timeframe; meaning, you are prohibited from working within the guidelines for at least 18-24 months.

Market Description: It is always important to read and understand exactly what your Employer is restricting you from. If the contract states you are prohibited from practicing in the field of medicine upon the termination of this contract (and you are a radiologist), then clearly that will not be accepted as a reasonable restriction and would not be enforced. However, if it states that you are not allowed to practice in the field of radiology within the stated guidelines, than courts can consider that as reasonable.

Duties/Responsibilities

For no apparent reason, Employers tend to be lazy when it comes to defining and explaining what your job actually entails. Through my experience, I have noticed that the majority of contracts will define duties as “what is reasonably conducted in the (insert field) profession.”

It is always advised to question the employer and receive a thorough explanation on what “reasonable” actually means. There could be several implications, and more often than not, no two people will carry the same definition and meaning to the word. I always advise my clients to ensure you have a detailed understanding as to what is expected of you when you enter into your profession, and stay clear from ambiguity.

Fringe Benefits

Your employment agreement should always indicate exactly what benefits you are to receive. Furthermore, keep in mind that the variety and flexibility in your benefits will depend on the type of practice you are in. If you find yourself in a smaller practice, you may be able to negotiate a more individualized package. However, in larger practices you will more likely have a uniform program covering all employees; thus, less room for negotiating.

The following are the more common benefits that tend to be addressed the most during negotiations:

Insurance: Always make sure to ask what types of insurance you are being offered; whether it is health, dental, life, or disability. Health insurance is traditionally the most common of the four, however depending on the size of your company, employers do still offer life and disability.

Vacation: It is inevitable that you will receive vacation days, however what you may not know is whether you are permitted from carrying over those days to the following year. Furthermore, is Continuing Medical Education (CME) time included as part of your vacation days, or are they in addition to them?

Malpractice Insurance: No matter how perfect of a physician you are, or consider yourself to be, having malpractice insurance is vital. More importantly, knowing which type you have can be equally as vital. There are primarily two types of malpractice coverage that an employer can offer:

Occurrence. The physician is covered for malpractice that occurs during the period that the policy was in force, regardless of when the claim is filed.

Claims. The physician is covered for claims filed during the coverage period regardless of when the malpractice occurred.

More often than not, because of the expensive premiums associated with occurrence based coverage, you will find yourself in a claims based insurance coverage. Therefore, it is imperative that you inquire into the purchase of a “tail” policy, which covers claims that can be filed after your coverage period ends.

Whether you are a newbie or an experienced physician, always remember that employers always have their own best interest in mind. Therefore, it is important to never simply browse over your contract without giving it the attention it truly deserves. I advise every physician I have encountered, always seek the opinion and advice of a trusted professional who can provide you with a sound analysis and possibly assist you during your negotiating phase. Remember, as a physician, the large salary and healthy lifestyle is expected, but to live a peaceful life, it is the parameters of your contract, the additional clauses that make the difference.

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Analysis: Arab Spring Likely to Leave Oil Firms Unscathed

June 23, 2011 by · Leave a Comment 

By Tom Bergin

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A Tunisian artisan makes tributes to the “Arab Spring” revolution by etching flags on bronze plates in the medina, the old city of Tunis, June 14, 2011.

REUTERS/Zoubeir Souissi

LONDON (Reuters) – Western oil firms are unlikely to face widespread asset seizures or contract revisions as a result of Arab uprisings, thanks to deft diplomacy, legal protections and efforts to depict themselves as partners of the local citizenry.

In the past, big political shifts in the Middle East have often been followed by the eviction of foreign oil producers — Muammar Gaddafi in Libya, Saddam Hussein in Iraq and Ayatollah Khomeini in Iran to cite a few examples.

This time around, upheaval has hit Libya, Egypt, Yemen, Tunisia and Syria — not the biggest oil producers in the Arab world but among the most open to foreign investment. Companies including BP Plc, Exxon Mobil and Royal Dutch Shell have spent billions there.

“I wouldn’t describe us as worried. We’re being vigilant,” said Bob Dudley, chief executive of BP, echoing comments from other companies.

The new governments that have emerged, or may emerge, are expected by and large to remain supportive of foreign investment, because they will wish to maintain output and government revenues.
“I don’t see there being a large nationalistic wave,” said Richard Quin, Middle East analyst at Wood Mackenzie.

In the past popular anger toward a regime has spilled over to the companies that supported it, but oil companies say that over the past two decades, they have positioned themselves on the side of communities, rather than as agents of government.

“Companies now are not so closely aligned with governments,” said Mahdi Sajjad, president of Syria-focused Gulfsands Petroleum, whose shares have been hit by investor fears about the unrest.
In part this has been achieved by investing in community engagement projects. Oil contracts that are more transparent and more favorable toward host nations also play a big role.

Contract Changes

Up to the 1970s, oil contracts were opaque and seen as beneficial to companies and the region’s frequently corrupt governments — at the expense of citizens. Now contracts usually follow internationally accepted models.

This will help oil executives argue they are giving host nations the best deal that a new leadership could hope to get and, therefore, that existing contracts should be respected.
“We look at it (investment) from a perspective of the fundamental stakeholders, the population of the country .. rather than through the lens of the current incumbent government,” said Frank Chapman, chief executive of British Gas producer BG Group.

“What we are doing in Tunisia and Egypt is sustainable,” he added.

Oil companies have beaten a path to new leaders in Egypt and Tunisia, and, an Italian ministerial source told Reuters last month, even to Libyan rebel leaders. Companies say the signals received so far do not point to widespread asset seizures.

If new governments do seek to expropriate oil fields or to rewrite contracts, companies will find they have greater legal protection than they did when the last wave of nationalization swept through the Arab world in the 1970s.

Modern contracts bar governments from taking unilateral action to seize assets and can limit their ability to hike taxes. And if there is a dispute over whether the government has overstepped its authority, companies don’t have to worry about arguing their cases in front of potentially biased local courts.

“Contracts usually provide for arbitration in a neutral venue,” Anthony Sinclair, a partner with law firm Allen & Overy said.

Potential for Loss Still

In addition, many countries have signed bilateral investment treaties, known as BITs, which commit them to protect foreign investments in their territories.
“There are close to 3,000 of these treaties in existence,” Sinclair said.

These will help deter unilateral moves against companies, but they will not protect companies against all losses. International litigation can drag on for decades, during which opportunities are lost, said Harry Clark, partner at Dewey & LeBoeuf. This suggests companies might agree to unfavorable contract changes that would not be upheld in court.

Also oil companies can face a big financial hit if instability delays production.

“The oil industry values everything in net present value terms … (and) because you are pushing things out, on a discounted cash flow basis, that will erode value,” said Quin.
BP and other companies have suspended operations in Libya, while French oil major Total said it lost production at one field in Yemen due to the conflict there.
Sajjad said Gulfsands’ operations in Syria were unaffected, but the conflict could create difficulties in importing equipment there and in other countries — especially if new sanctions are imposed against governments fighting revolts.

There is little companies can do to limit such losses.

Yet some executives say the problems thrown up by the Arab Spring simply reflect the intrinsic nature of the oil business.

“It is always like that in exploration, you can always face different kinds of issues .. This is part of life for an oil and gas company,” said Total head of strategy Jean-Jacques Mosconi.

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Hidden Costs of War–Stunning Statistics About the War Every American Should Know

December 27, 2009 by · Leave a Comment 

By Jeremy Scahill / Rebel Reports

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Afghan soldiers take part in a military training exercise at a Turkish commando training center near the southern city of Isparta December 18, 2009. Dozens of Afghan troops are undergoing training on explosives, mountain climbing and anti-terrorism tactics at a Turkish commando training center. Turkey, NATO’s sole Muslim member, took over the rotating command of the peacekeeping mission in Kabul but does not want to participate in combat operations.

REUTERS/Umit BEKTAS

A hearing in Sen. Claire McCaskill’s Contract Oversight subcommittee on contracting in Afghanistan has highlighted some important statistics that provide a window into the extent to which the Obama administration has picked up the Bush-era war privatization baton and sprinted with it. Overall, contractors now comprise a whopping 69% of the Department of Defense’s total workforce, “the highest ratio of contractors to military personnel in US history.” That’s not in one war zone—that’s the Pentagon in its entirety.

In Afghanistan, the Obama administration blows the Bush administration out of the privatized water. According to a memo [PDF] released by McCaskill’s staff, “From June 2009 to September 2009, there was a 40% increase in Defense Department contractors in Afghanistan.  During the same period, the number of armed private security contractors working for the Defense Department in Afghanistan doubled, increasing from approximately 5,000 to more than 10,000.”

At present, there are 104,000 Department of Defense contractors in Afghanistan. According to a report this week from the Congressional Research Service, as a result of the coming surge of 30,000 troops in Afghanistan, there may be up to 56,000 additional contractors deployed. But here is another group of contractors that often goes unmentioned: 3,600 State Department contractors and 14,000 USAID contractors. That means that the current total US force in Afghanistan is approximately 189,000 personnel (68,000 US troops and 121,000 contractors). And remember, that’s right now. And that, according to McCaskill, is a conservative estimate. A year from now, we will likely see more than 220,000 US-funded personnel on the ground in Afghanistan.

The US has spent more than $23 billion on contracts in Afghanistan since 2002. By next year, the number of contractors will have doubled since 2008 when taxpayers funded over $8 billion in Afghanistan-related contracts.

Despite the massive number of contracts and contractors in Afghanistan, oversight is utterly lacking. “The increase in Afghanistan contracts has not seen a corresponding increase in contract management and oversight,” according to McCaskill’s briefing paper. “In May 2009, DCMA [Defense Contract Management Agency] Director Charlie Williams told the Commission on Wartime Contracting that as many as 362 positions for Contracting Officer’s Representatives (CORs) in Afghanistan were currently vacant.”

A former USAID official, Michael Walsh, the former director of USAID’s Office of Acquisition and Assistance and Chief Acquisition Officer, told the Commission that many USAID staff are “administering huge awards with limited knowledge of or experience with the rules and regulations.” According to one USAID official, the agency is “sending too much money, too fast with too few people looking over how it is spent.” As a result, the agency does not “know … where the money is going.”

The Obama administration is continuing the Bush-era policy of hiring contractors to oversee contractors. According to the McCaskill memo:

In Afghanistan, USAID is relying on contractors to provide oversight of its large reconstruction and development projects.  According to information provided to the Subcommittee, International Relief and Development (IRD) was awarded a five-year contract in 2006 to oversee the $1.4 billion infrastructure contract awarded to a joint venture of the Louis Berger Group and Black and Veatch Special Projects.  USAID has also awarded a contract Checci and Company to provide support for contracts in Afghanistan.

The private security industry and the US government have pointed to the Synchronized Predeployment and Operational Tracker(SPOT) as evidence of greater government oversight of contractor activities. But McCaskill’s subcommittee found that system utterly lacking, stating: “The Subcommittee obtained current SPOT data showing that there are currently 1,123 State Department contractors and no USAID contractors working in Afghanistan.” Remember, there are officially 14,000 USAID contractors and the official monitoring and tracking system found none of these people and less than half of the State Department contractors.

As for waste and abuse, the subcommittee says that the Defense Contract Audit Agency identified more than $950 million in questioned and unsupported costs submitted by Defense Department contracts for work in Afghanistan. That’s 16% of the total contract dollars reviewed.

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